Sweeteners Are Everywhere: Look Out for Hidden Sugars!

I was on a grocery store tour with my husband the other day, as he explained the “do’s and don’ts” of shopping for food.  We were on the subject of sweeteners, and were hence looking at honey and agave nectar.  One of his clients mentioned that agave nectar isn’t very sweet, so you usually need a lot to make a difference.

Later that afternoon, my husband and I grabbed a couple of Americano’s at a cute place we like near his work (Pomegranate Bistro, for those of

airmoore
photo credit: airmoore

you in my area).  I love this place because their ingredients are fresh and light.  And their coffee stand offers agave nectar and Sugar in the Raw as a sweetener for your drinks. 

If you recall, I much prefer these natural sweeteners over Pink and Blue Death (Sweet & Low and Equal) or white table sugar any day.

So I squeezed some agave nectar into my coffee.  And remembering my husband’s client’s words, I kept squeezing, even though I knew I shouldn’t.  I took one sip…and bleh!  WAY too sweet.  I just ruined my $1.95 fufu coffee drink.  Well, I didn’t want it to go to waste, so I kept sipping.

About halfway through the 8 ounces, as we strolled through Macy’s bedding department, my stomach started cramping.  Not only was I incredibly unsettled by the fact that I felt a major urge to do something very un-lady-like between the aisles over-priced Egyptian cotton pillowcases and the over-rated silk fitted sheets, I was perplexed by why I thought that agave nectar is way too sweet, even though my husband’s client might think it’s not sweet enough.

As I rushed to the men’s department to find my husband and tell him that it was time to leave, I realized that one person’s sweet is another person’s not-so-sweet.  But why?

Now, I’m not saying this is the case with my husband’s client, but some people are more accustomed to sugars, therefore are less affected by a high dosage.  It’s like if you get headaches often and are always popping Advil, one Advil is going to do nothing for you while it might work worlds of wonders for someone who rarely takes it.

But my husband’s client also eats fairly healthily.  It’s not like she eats Skittles and Nerds every day, so why might she be more accustomed to sugars than I? 

Could it be those crafty hidden sugars?

The Joys of Hidden Sugars

Uwe Hermann
photo credit: Uwe Hermann

Just when you think you’ve eliminated all forms of sugar from your life – you stopped eating candy, you use applesauce in your baking instead of sugar, and you stopped drinking Coke with every meal – little did you know that you’re being sabotaged by all kinds of sugars that you probably don’t even realize are there.

Sugars can go incognito, disguised as many fancy terms you might overlook:

  • cane juice
  • corn syrup (like that nasty high fructose corn syrup)
  • sorghum
  • glucose
  • lactose
  • maltose
  • fructose
  • sucralose
  • xorbitol
  • mannitol

If it ends in “ose” or “ol” it’s most likely a sugar.  And don’t forget that artificial sweetener, aspartame.  As far as I’m concerned, that’s another one of those chemically processed ingredients that pretend to be good for you, but in actuality it’s out to get you.  Hm, kind of reminds me of Rebecca DeMornay’s character in “The Hand that Rocks the Cradle.”  Whatever happened to her anyway?

So how are these ingredients hidden?  Well, you’d expect sweeteners to be in candy and other foods that are supposed to be sweet.  But did you know that sugar is in almost everything?  Many of the packaged foods that you buy have some kind of added sweetener in it.  Here are some common ones:

  • bread
  • ketchup
  • spaghetti sauce
  • salad dressing
  • mustard
  • beef jerky
  • peanut butter
  • jams and jellies

So while you think you’re limiting your sugar intake, you may actually still be consuming way more than you should.  Food manufacturers add sweeteners to their products not only because they know that the American pallate prefers sweet, but because the sweeteners increase your craving for the food, so you’ll eat more!

Your best bet is to buy these foods in the natural section of your grocery store.  While they may still have added sweeteners, they’ll at least be in natural forms (evaporated cane juice, brown sugar, organic cane sugar, etc.)  instead of in the artificial forms (high fructose corn syrup, aspartame, corn syrup solids, etc.). 

Always check the nutrition label and the number of sugars in 1 serving.  And remember that 1 package might contain multiple servings!  You should always try to stay below 4 grams, which is the equivalent of 1 packet of sugar.  But of course, the fewer the better.  Try to get the product that lists the sweetener as low on the ingredient list as possible.

Also, be weary of “Lite” and “Low-Fat” choices.  The fat that is taken out is usually replaced with sugar.

Once you’re aware of the presence of these sweeteners, you can begin to take the steps to moderate your intake.  (No, you don’t need a cup of ketchup on your eggs.)  As you decrease your intake, you’ll begin to notice that you just don’t feel the same way about sweet as you used to.  (I could never get through the grande mochas of my past.)

 And hopefully you’ll remember to add agave nectar in small amounts before dumping it into your coffee.  You’ll be glad you did.  Macy’s will be glad too.

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2 thoughts on “Sweeteners Are Everywhere: Look Out for Hidden Sugars!

  1. I love the list of sugars. I’m writing the one’s I’m not familiar with down so I can make sure they’re not in my bread! I’m picky about bread, everything else, not so much. I did recently break my sugar packet habit…

    Salt is where my husband and I differ. I think things are way too salty and he doesn’t think they’re salty enough. I hate added salts and make him add after rather than before. Besides, if he adds it after, he can taste it better without having to use as much.

  2. Wow. Your husband’s client must have some sweet tooth! I find agave nectar very sweet, and use it exclusively as a sweetener because I can use so much less of it to get the desired effect.

    Better luck next time!

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